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27 Feb 2017

Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Business women: Data 2004-2007

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Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Business women: Data 2004-2007

·         Women of mixed ethnicity are over two and a half times more entrepreneurial than white women (ibid GEM, London Business School, 2006)

·         BAME female entrepreneurship is clustered in areas of multiple deprivation, suggesting that ‘employment substitution’ is taking place with low-paid work being sub-contracted and women having to act on their own account (ibid Harding 2007)

·         The predominant source of start-up finance for many ethnic groups is friends and family. The figures are ‘other Asian’ 53.4%, Pakistani 93%, Black African 52.6% and Black Other 52.9%. The predominant source of finance for White people is bank overdraft (29.3%) as it is for Black Caribbean people (38.8%) (ibid GEM, London Business School 2004).

·         For black people there is almost no entrepreneurial gender gap (black female entrepreneurial activity is 97% of black male entrepreneurial activity) (ibid Harding 2007).

·         Total Entrepreneurial Activity (TEA) for white females is 3.6% and is two and a half times higher amongst women from mixed backgrounds (10.2%), for Bangladeshi women it is (10.9%), Other Asians (10.3%) and Black Caribbeans (10.5%). The most entrepreneurial female grouping is that of ‘other Black’ at (29.9%) of all women. (ibid GEM, London Business School 2004).

·         Black women are most likely to feel that ethnicity has strong impact on business (80%), compared to Chinese women (46%) and Asian women (46%). (Ethnic Minority Business Conference 2005)

·         25% of ethnic minority owned businesses report a lack of self-confidence with finance, which is above the average level (16%). (Dr Stuart Fraser, Finance for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises, 2005)

·         A survey of over 300 BAME women leaders found that over three quarters felt the leadership style of white women is more positively perceived in the workplace and 80% felt that the communication style of white women is more positively regarded. (Different Women, Different Places, The Diversity Practice Ltd, 2007)

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